Menu

Steve Stine Guitar Lesson – Music Theory Fundamentals – Essential Chord Theory

100 Comments



(electric guitar music) – Hi, Steve Stine from GuitarZoom here. I just wanna say thank
you, thank you so much for everybody that’s
been responding to these music theory guitar theory videos. It’s been awesome. I’m so excited that you
guys are learning this stuff and you’re actually realizing how important it is to learn
fundamental theory. It’s not a scary thing and
it’s not like you gotta go to six years of college
to learn this stuff. It’s not all that and I’m glad that you’re now realizing that. So in the first video, what we did was we set up the scenario
of the chromatic scale, understanding how all
of these notes in music actually work together, we
applied it to the guitar. The second thing that
we did, was we started learning how the major scale works and how all the keys of the
major scale are actually the same structure over and over and over, it’s just as you move
further and further away from that pure key of C,
you get more accidentals, more sharps or more flats in your key, and then we learn how to
apply that to our guitar. So now the next thing we need to do is start learning some basic chord theory. Now you probably know
how to play a G chord and a D chord and a C
chord and things like that, but you might not know what’s
actually happening in there. And of course the question always is well why do I need to know? Well you don’t need to
know anything, I suppose, but the trick would be is
knowing those things actually tell you what notes are being
emphasized within each chord, which can really come in
handy if you’re a singer, if you’re trying to write a solo or you’re trying to write a melody or you’re trying to
improvise over the top, all kinds of different
things can happen there. Instead of just knowing shapes, if I know that this G chord is actually generating these notes, (electric guitar playing) it can give my whole musical
perspective direction as opposed to just going
well that’s a G chord and this is the chord or the
scale G, and not really having any relationship between
the chords and the scales. So that’s what I’m gonna
show you right now. So if you look at my white board here I’ve got chord theory basics. What we’re gonna do is
we’re gonna start off by learning what a chord really is. The root of a chord, the
strength of what a chord is. The first thing we need
to learn is this, triad. The term triad, which
obviously means three. Chords always start off as triads. In music theory, a chord
needs to be a triad and then we can expand into other things. We can make that chord bigger. We can alter that chord,
and again we’re gonna do all those kinda things in the course, but let’s talk about that
basic fundamental element, which is the root, the
third, and the fifth. Those three notes make up
every chord that you play. When you play a G or a D
or an A minor or an E minor or a G7 or whatever it might be, everything, from a
diminished to an augmented to a demented to a major or minor chord, it doesn’t matter what
it is, they all start off with this essential core triad. Now, we’ve got our key of C here. These are our roots, these
are our roots, right there. So when you’re in the key of
C, we know we get the notes C D E F G A and B, and
we know that because the key of C has no sharps and no flats. This seven note scale is
going to generate seven individual, independent chords. Every key will. The beauty of this is
by the time we get done, you’re gonna know all the chords for all the keys, it’s pretty cool. So let’s take a look
at this to begin with. We have to have a root,
a third, and a fifth, and we’re talking about the
distance from the root itself. So we have a root, which is C. If we go up a third, so we’re at one, two, three, we add on the note E. If we go up a fifth, we go
one, two, three, four, five. C is itself, it’s one. One, two, three, four, five. We look at the next chord, we have D. Well D, one, two, three, D F and A. One, two, three, four, five. The shortcut I have is
that you just count up every other note for
the first three notes. So E, FG, AB, and you
have to say it like that E, FG, AB, all spastically like that. E, G, B, that’s how I
used to do it in class is I would just sit there
and go A, BC, DE. G, AB, CD, and it would give me the
notes that I’m looking for. So F A C, F, GA, BC, root, third, fifth. G B D, G, B, D, remember C is C is C. So you don’t have two Cs,
it’s just C D E F G A B, C D E F G A B, on and on and on. So your chord is G B D, A C E, and B D F, those are the notes. So when you play chords, these are the notes that you’re playing. Now, we’re not done, we have
to keep going here, alright? So the next thing we need to do is we need to talk about the intervals
or distances themselves for each one of these chords. You gotta follow along,
and again if you have a piece of paper and a pencil, or if you don’t, pause the
video and go grab those and come on back because
this is gonna be huge. So C to E, what we wanna learn are the distances between each one of these. The distance from C to E is a third. The distance from C to G is a fifth. Root, third, fifth, but the truth is what chords really are are stacked thirds. C to E is a third, E to G is a third, then we’d add another third
and we’d add another third and we’d add another third,
that’s how chords are created. Extending chords, we just keep stacking on another third over and over and over. D to F is a third, F to
A is a third, and so on. So let’s look at the distances
between these thirds. C to E, let’s think in terms
of whole steps for now, and again we’ll get far more in depth in the course, but let
me help you with this. So C to E, how many
whole steps or half steps is it from C to E, and
your answer should be two. C to D is a whole step,
and D to E is a whole step. So this is two whole steps, and again this gets far deeper, but
I’m gonna try and just show you the basic
overview of how this works and then you can start using
it in your own playing. And then E to G, let’s
look at that distance. What’s the distance in terms of whole steps or half steps from E to G? And your answer should be one and a half. It’s one and a half steps. If we look at the next chord, D to F, what’s the distance there? D to E, E to F, what do you think? The answer is one and a half,
and the next one here is two. So you’ll see these two
chords, the problem is they’re different from each other. This first chord, two over
one and a half, is major. That’s the definition of a major chord. Is two whole steps over
one and a half steps. The next one we see is
one and a half over two, and that’s the definition
of a minor chord. Now when I say two,
whoops sorry about that, I gotta turn my marker there. When I say two, I’m talking about what we refer to as a major third. It is a third, we just talked about how these are stacked thirds. The bigger one is called major third. One and a half, then is of
course called minor third. So what you’re dealing
with here is a major chord, is a major third over a minor third. A minor chord is a minor third over a major chord or a major third, excuse me. So what’s awesome about this
is, let me just keep going and then again, when you’ve got some time, and you wanna work on this a little bit, grab your piece of paper, grab a pencil or a pen and take a look at this, and if you’ve got one now
you can keep going with me. E to G is one and a half, G to B is two. That’s a minor chord. F to A is two, A to C is one and a half. That’s a major chord,
two over one and a half. Here we’ve got two over one and a half, that’s a major chord as well. We’ll take a look at this
one, that’s one and a half, A to C is one and a half, C to E, is two. That’s a minor chord. Now, check this one
out, do this one for me. Take a look at this last one. What’s the distance from B to D? One and a half. What’s the distance from D to F? It’s one and a half. That’s kinda weird. So when you get one and a
half over one and a half, you get what’s called dim-
whoops sorry, diminished. It’s hard to write at an angle. You get diminished, this
chord is diminished. Now this is the point,
this is the big picture. Not that this isn’t important,
it’s incredibly important and we’re gonna study that
in detail in this course, but let me show you this,
this is the best part. We know that the first chord is major, because it’s two over one and a half, or a major third over a minor third. The second chord is minor, so I write it with a small Roman Numeral. The third chord is minor. The fourth chord is major,
it’s two over one and a half. The fifth chord is major,
it’s two over one and a half. The sixth chord is minor,
it’s one and a half over two, and the seventh chord is
its own little beasty, it’s a seven chord that’s diminished. Now the truth is, is in popular music, whether it’s country, rock, blues, pop, metal to a certain degree,
all those kinda things, the seven chord really
isn’t used that often. You use it a lot in jazz,
but in popular music we just don’t really use it that often and when it does occur, a lot
of times it actually is used incorrectly in terms of its theory. Now, again in the course, I’m gonna talk about all those kinda things. In the theory course, I
talk about all the things that don’t fit theoretically as well, which is what I call real world playing, or non-logical playing
and we’ll talk about all those kinda things
too, but what I want you to get out of this is that your one, your four, and your five is major, your two and your three and six are minor, and then of course your
seven is diminished. Because your half step and
whole step configuration from the last video is
the same for every key, the outcome is the same for every key. If you’re in the key of
G, your one four five is still gonna be major,
your two three six is still going to be minor, and your seven is still going to be diminished. That’s what’s awesome about
it because of this theory, you will learn all the
chords for all your keys. What you need of course is
again it’s all about order, and that’s why I’m doing these
videos for you to watch them. If you understand the chromatic scale, you can create the major
scale or the diatonic scale, which is what we did in the
first and second videos. From there, we can create these chords, and we can create this chord
structure of understanding that the one four five is major and now we know why, and
the two and three and six are minor, and of course
again now we know why. So if we knew that the key of
G gets one sharp, an F sharp, we just go G major, A minor, B minor, C major, D major, E
minor, F sharp diminished. If we knew that the key of D gets an F sharp and a C sharp, and it does because of the video we
talked about last time, well then we got D major,
E minor, F sharp minor, G major, A major, B
minor, C sharp diminished. Boom, it’s that easy. So it’s not that it takes
so much time, it’s that you have to just take things
slow and think about it. Again, if we start with the white board, if we start with
understanding what it is that we’re trying to do, we get
our brain wrapped around it, then we can go to our guitar and we can start applying these things. So the last thing I wanna
do for you right now, if I can find my guitar pick, there we go, is I want to apply this
idea to your guitar so you can actually start using this and move it to any key you want. So let’s head up to the C here. So we’ve got C D E F G A B C, and remember we talked about that last time. C D E F G A B C, well from
each one of those notes, we’re gonna put a chord onto that. Now, we need to know our bar chords, so that’s gonna be important. I’m just gonna be playing
major and minor bar chords to show you this, but you could play this anywhere on your fret board. So on this C chord or on the note C, I’m gonna play a C major chord. (chord plays) And the major bar chord,
of course, is done by pressing on all strings with my first finger across the eighth fret, and then I add my middle finger on the third string, ninth fret, and I add my ring finger on the
fifth string, tenth fret, and I add my pinky on the
fourth string, tenth fret. That’s a major bar chord, I’m on C. Now the next one I’ve got is a D minor. So I’m gonna move up a whole step to D, and I’m gonna make this minor by taking the middle finger off. Now this is pretty cool, think about this. The major was two over one and a half, the minor was one and a half over two. The note that changes is the third. If I had a C chord right
here, which I do, C E and G, now pay careful attention to
this, this is pretty cool. This is a theory tip,
which I have all kinds of those in the course as well. This is two over one and a half. So right now I’m playing
this C chord, C major, right here, that’s what
I’m playing, C E and G. If I wanted this chord to be minor, all I would have to do is take this E and move it back to E flat, which would make this one and a half, and this two. And the way we do that on our guitar is we just take that finger off. This note right here is the
E, that makes it E flat. So if you ever have a major chord and you wanna make it minor, all you do is flat this middle note, you
lower it one, E becomes E flat. Here’s another major chord,
A would become A flat. Here’s another major chord,
B would become B flat. And, of course, on the
guitar how we do that, this middle note, this
middle finger, I should say, excuse me, is the note that’s the third. This is that note that
we’re talking about. So I take that off, and it becomes minor. Pretty cool, huh? So again, there’s lots of
revelations in this course. There’s lots of different cool things that we’re gonna talk about in detail so you don’t question
your fret board anymore. So let’s keep going. We got C major, we got D
minor, now we’re gonna move up two whole steps, or excuse
me, a whole step higher, we’re gonna go E minor, so
C major, D minor, E minor. On the fifth string, we’re gonna do an F major fifth string bar chord. So I’m barring over the bottom five, I’m using my third finger to press on the second, third, and fourth strings. At the tenth fret, that’s
major, then I’m gonna move up to my five chord,
which is also major, and then my six chord which is minor. So we have C D E F G
A, major, minor, minor, major, major, and then
when I move up to A minor, or yeah A minor here
because I’m in this key. I’m barring over again
the bottom five strings, and I’m gonna put my ring finger on the fourteenth fret of the fourth string, my pinky on the fourteenth
fret of the third string, and my middle finger on the
second string thirteenth fret, sorry about that, and there’s my minor. So the awesome part about this is if you know your bar
chords, I’ve got myself major, major, major,
there’s my one, four, five, right there, my two, three, and six are sitting right there,
minor, minor, minor. So here’s one, four,
five, they’re all major, and then two, three, six are all minor, and then I’ve got my
little diminished chord over here, which is done by playing fourteenth fret of the fifth string, fifteenth fret of the fourth string, fourteenth fret of the third string, fifteenth fret of the second string. With that, we can play a
diminished chord right here. Now again, I’m not worried
about the diminished, it’s the other six I want
you to really think about. So I’ve got major, minor,
minor, major, major, minor, because now I could head
down to the key of G, and I have major, minor,
minor, major, major, minor. Think about how easy that
would be, with that knowledge, to be able to transpose in any key. Or somebody says oh
we’re gonna do this song and it’s in the key of
D, and you’re like ah! No big deal, you find
D, you set yourself up, you put all six chords
in, you’re ready to go. Now, there are changes, right? There are fluctuations,
there’s alterations that happen in music
and we’re gonna discuss all of those kinda things in this course, but this is a great place for you to start to begin building all of this. So, please remember, again thank you for all the responses we’ve been getting on the Facebook community page. Any time that we can discuss these things and make them make sense
to you, please do so. We’re here to help you,
that’s the whole point. So if you go to Facebook,
you find the GuitarZoom community page, you sign
up for it, just join it, and we can talk about any of these things at any point in time, so
I encourage you to do so. Don’t feel like, I
shouldn’t ask that question because people should already know that. People shouldn’t already know anything, that’s how you learn, you
gotta ask those questions. So in the next video, we’re gonna learn how to take the major
scale and we’re gonna convert that major scale into minor and see the foreshadowing
of how modes work. So good luck with our chord
theory, and I’ll see you soon.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

100 thoughts on “Steve Stine Guitar Lesson – Music Theory Fundamentals – Essential Chord Theory”

  1. Steve Stine Guitar Lessons says:

    Need help with your Guitar Path?
    https://gzoom.me/help-me-choose-ss

    See Steve's Guitar Courses:
    https://gzoom.me/guitar-courses-ss

    * SUBSCRIBE: http://stevestine.me/subscribeYouTube

    Request a Guitar Lesson Video:
    https://gzoom.me/request-a-lesson-ss

    Ask Steve a question:
    https://gzoom.me/ask-steve-ss

  2. Alfonzo Aguilar says:

    Its currently 2 am where I am at and seriously .. Im learning theory now.makes me understand chords better now🎸 salute .

  3. Flame Flame says:

    I'm so Blessed watching the tutorials of this Cool Music Teacher, and I've learned a lot from him! And Im actually using it whenever i play. Anyway I'm already watching Steve Stine since 3 years ago up until now

  4. Blu Tint Photography™ says:

    wow

  5. Glorified says:

    This is a very nice tutorial. Will going to help me create more songs here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCs2CT7xjDN_22a85i6UX1TQ?view_as=subscriber

  6. Byron of Cascadia says:

    Thanks. Great way to break it down. I needed this

  7. Saphiro Barcenas says:

    i learned a lot thank you so much sir steve😊😊😊

  8. N.Sameer kumar says:

    It's boom….sir…Ur awesome

  9. Lhingneithem Haokip says:

    I m too weak to learn that 😂😂

  10. Partha pratim says:

    I didn't understand from 6.10

  11. AUTONOX GAMING says:

    I don't understand why the distance b/w C to E is 2 & E to G is 1 1/2 ??? 🤔🤔 Please explain

  12. Keith Lacey says:

    Craze the hell out of me "theory" I just want to see riffs and rhythm.
    Makes my head go round and round. I personally don't want a mathematic or science course.

  13. Bobby Kirk says:

    Steve is the man master guitarist

  14. Denis Enache says:

    Thanh's Steve ! Great job ! I learn a lot of things from yoy !

  15. The Kiss off says:

    I'm sooo relieved to find you Steve thanks a lot. _CPG from Arizona

  16. Steve Schenker says:

    I've watched Steve's videos before, and liked them, but I subscribed after watching this one. Super useful, and well explained! Also, repeating "A b C d E…" (etc.) to myself to help with memorization is awesome advice!

  17. ND 27 says:

    Steve Stine has to be one of the best teachers i have seen on YouTube, very clear and articulate, thank you !

  18. kwchang jamatia says:

    Thanks you solve my problems

  19. choochoochooseyou says:

    Great teacher, Steve.

  20. Xose Aser Estévez Álvarez says:

    Steve Stine : Thank's so very much MASTER , for your tutorial lessons…!
    Salutation from Galiza…!

  21. ahsan uz zaman says:

    I used to play guitar and became pretty good 'technically'. But I soon grew tired of blindly covering songs without understanding the theory behind those. And that was years ago ( med school happened and i graduated). Somehow i took my guitar once again and this time it would be better,i can feel it!
    Thank you so much! Love from 'Bangladesh'!

  22. armouredcat23 says:

    well you can just google a chord sheet for every key, so no point in learning it other than the alphabet and positions of notes on the guitar. but good vid

  23. Gill Fisher says:

    The Circle of Fifth's is a stairway to hell for most. Steve makes the pain go away. Music theory is the key.

  24. Dan Bromberg says:

    At 16:47 you describe the fingering of the Diminished chord; according to my chord book, that fingering looks like a Bmin7(b5) ? Comments welcome…

  25. Louis Line21 says:

    😱 🙏🏻

    This is really good explanation of guitar lesson, this is what I need as a Beginner. Awesome.

    You are definitely the most patient quitar teacher I’ve ever met.

    This is definitely what I am looking for.

    🙏🏻👍🏻

  26. Mac Tron says:

    awesome

  27. Ar Ma says:

    How is c to e 2 and e to g 1 1/2 someone tell me

  28. mlg4035 says:

    This theory lesson is EPIC!!! It clears up so much confusion and creates so much clarity about how music 'works'!! Now I have to go back and watch the first two videos to add some missing perspective. Steve Stine, you ROCK!!! Thank you! I'm signing up for your theory course today!!

  29. PatriotPreacher says:

    Wow GREAT JOB explaining that. Thanks for sharing, Blessings in Christ.

  30. Chuck Davis says:

    I've watched this video multiple times. I always learn (or am reminded of) something! Steve is awesome. I'd like to buy him lunch.

  31. Retired43 says:

    Blew my mind. Thanks

  32. Jeff Wilson says:

    Hey Steve just want to say thank you for all the knowledge. I'm an instructor (helicopters) myself and greatly appreciate your approach to teaching. I've seen allot of videos on guitar theory and you by far are the best I've found. Cheers.

  33. Stephen Rindler says:

    Steve..
    I get the 1, 3, & 5, but I don't get the 1&1/2..

  34. Laura Henthorne says:

    I appreciate your style which is so easy to learn from. Thank you.

  35. Skinny Gumbo says:

    Who are the 122 losers who downvoted this?

  36. Ricardo Palma says:

    thanks for the video! while watching, I kept thinking of the movie Tommy Boy "one and a HAAALF percent!"

  37. Mark Taylor says:

    No doubt about it, this is the best explanation and easiest way to understand the structure of music and how it works on a guitar. Excellent Steve!

  38. Son Labay says:

    Oh my goodness , I can't believe how much information you fed me in! haha , thanks man ! really appreciate your tutorials. and also finally Youtube recommendation done a great job recommending stuff!

  39. Richard Silva says:

    I think your lessons are top importance

  40. Joseph Moffitt says:

    Steve is a great teacher. Best out here

  41. Dustin McLeod says:

    Where do you get the "2" and the "1 1/2" from though? I don't understand beyond that.

  42. Miyu Kento says:

    What do u mean by 1½…i cannot understand….e to g is 2 right?

  43. Ritam Mondal says:

    Love from india sir

  44. Abonmei Masangongpou says:

    I completely understand Broda …thanks to you

  45. Omegaseven says:

    Seeing the definition of a maj or min chord just blew my mind.
    Never hammered on that subscribe button so fast before!
    Thank you for sharing your knowledge <3

  46. Brian Keegan says:

    I've seen many videos of this and this one by far is the most thought out.

  47. Bikalp gurung says:

    U r awesome sir,I was always stuck to a certain level ,it was very frustrating, now I knew it's all bcoz I had no basic idea now m clear n my level is Increasing again which was stuck thank so very much sir

  48. that_singh_who_sings says:

    Fabulous. How simple and yet so so informative. I am going to binge watch all your videos. Ofcourse put to practice too sir!

  49. Thodoris Thodoris says:

    thanx!!!!! very good

  50. Ever Leonardo says:

    so impressive.. 🙂 now i know.. thank you

  51. Blake Avon says:

    Thank you Steve Stine

  52. Arun Ragnar says:

    Then answer me why c major has CEC instead of CEG in c major open chord

  53. Shashank Sherkar says:

    Steve good info again. I have books for this and how chords are built: major,minor, augmented and diminished. I suck at other types. I would be having this video as a backup. Thanks bro!

  54. guitar107 says:

    Steve, your teaching style is great. It's very easy to learn from.

  55. Ronald Sy says:

    I realy wants ur chanel..

  56. TELUGU TERMINATOR DREAM11 FANTASY says:

    I am passionate to learn guitar… By seeing Your Tutorial I got confidence.. plz Teach me Easy way of Basics To Master Techniques

  57. Keith Iscool says:

    would be helpful to explain HOW you get 1 1/2 – cuz my math says 2… confusing sir

  58. Bayana Okbay says:

    Amaizing thanks

  59. Ranajeet I. Dutta says:

    Your videos are interesting. Can you make a video on diminished scale and what chords we get from every note on diminished scale. It would be helpful.

  60. biswajit adhikary says:

    Sir your vdeo very helpful me.

  61. Michael Healy says:

    My fret board is gonna question me! 😂

  62. John Joshua says:

    hi sir can you help to find minor chords without holding barre chord. is there any way?

  63. KipIngram says:

    Steve, I have to say I've seen a lot of guitar videos over the years that I thought had at least some level of merit, but yours are the best bar none. Everything about your content, your presentation style, your personality, etc. is just spot on for me. Thanks for putting this material together – I feel nearly sure I'll spring for one of your courses; I just need to figure out which one. This video in particular is excellent – most of the bits of information in it I already knew, but you just brought them together with such clarity that I feel like I actually "get" the big picture better.

    Keep up the great work, man!

  64. duelbuster123 says:

    i always zoning out when im in lecture room
    but i actually have attention for this guy

  65. Gill Fisher says:

    Your opening statement is 100% true. You are changing the world of music. Taking the pain our of learning fast.

  66. Jeganmad music says:

    Hi, am able to find the song notes and key of the song. But dont know how the multiple chords to use. Please help me..

  67. Auntie Jane says:

    Damn, that was the most comprehensive lesson ever, thanks mate

  68. Auntie Jane says:

    your hair color is beautiful

  69. George Tzakman says:

    Thanks man TzakRider from Greece

  70. Sameena Kausar says:

    Beautifully explained !
    Precious theoretical tips given in this video and then these tips applied on the guitar.
    I have never come across such a wonderful teacher till date.
    I always played guitar blindly without applying theory to it.Rather I imitated other guitar players by rewinding their videos but now the whole picture of me playing guitar has changed,ever since I started watching your wonderful tutorials.
    Lucky to have found you on YouTube.
    Please don't ever stop posting guitar tutorials on YouTube.
    Thanks !!

  71. Maximian Gonzalez says:

    When you do major chords 4 and 5 are you supposed to press down and strum the high e string as well while you bar strings 2,3,4? Or somehow try to avoid pressing down on it with your ring finger

  72. MrAdamNTProtester says:

    Instead of jumping in with the Circle of Fifths your method lays the foundation for a better understanding & use of that tool as a compositional map… really great lessons… if I can understand this the first time through then in 15 years there is probably going to be an army of guitarists emerging in America from taking their nascent tutelage through your kick a$$ vids… thanks Steve

  73. MonsterUnderwear says:

    Watched most of your lattest videos about chords, scales and all and you always saying "1,4,5 always major, 2,3,6 always minor" I then "ok ill recieve that" …until now i watch this laugh and thinking "wow this man IS really mastering what he teach"
    Thankyou somuch sir, i have develop alot.

  74. Nichen Gurung says:

    What is the thorey?

  75. bubbasouth69 says:

    30 years ago I believed theory was a bad thing. However, it wasn’t until I applied it that I became proficient at playing guitar.

  76. bubbasouth69 says:

    Ever heard of the Nashville Number System? That’s what he’s explaining here. Those who dread the word “theory” are indeed using it but many don’t realize it.

  77. Pinaki Das says:

    Lots of thanks to make the guitar playing is so easy & interesting for us that i can't express.Now i never get fear or tensed about playing..every beginner should watch this video.i want more lesson from you.A 109k like for this.thank you so much.

  78. willem muller says:

    Thank YOU!!! I now finally understand the cords structures. The way you explained it is brilliant and easy to grasp.

  79. Shailendra Wagde says:

    Thank you for your guidance. Shailendra From india.

  80. Louie Alcala says:

    I'm halfway through this video and i paused to subscribe, great stuff

  81. Jhay Jhay says:

    This guy is a realy good teacher

  82. JK GAMING says:

    Thanks for your help…bro…

  83. Coming of christ Ministry says:

    Awesome boss… 😊

  84. luck sangma says:

    How did you count a distance of the keys, for instance you have shown like 2/ 1half.. Between the keys… All i can see the same distance… It may sound hilarious bt i dint get this video….. Plzz could u help me sir..??

  85. Rich Harms says:

    Exactly what I’ve been looking for and explained clearly. You rock hard! 🤘🏼 Sharing with my beginner friends and subscribing 😁

  86. rohan bhojane says:

    Hi Steve, I've a query Major E chord progression is E A B E, here A is 2.5 steps away from E & B is 1 step away, from theory Major E chord progression should have been E G# B, is there any kind of adjustment done here

  87. Murat Er says:

    Can you speak little slowly for understanding different languages to see you. Thanks

  88. John jayce Mejia says:

    I love this kind of presentation….am amazed how guitarist picking the songs without strumming ..and it really sounds the song it is..

  89. Reese May says:

    I cannot wrap my head around this……………Why is C to E, 2 steps, but E to G is only 1 1/2 steps?
    They look to me to both be 2 steps. I am missing something.

  90. TheLochan77 says:

    thanks , i got my one big doubt clear

  91. titus dinkar says:

    I am a beginner guitar player and of all the videos i've seen on youtube I find your videos very informative and detailed and best.

  92. Zdenko Kovacic says:

    Great teacher. I am 64 years old (retired in my country), so it's time to start doing what was my desire from time I was aware of my self. Was playing a violin when I was a child, it is time for something else now.

  93. sumit pal says:

    Dude u r awesome . U r making it so easy ❤️ love from india

  94. Kamal Uddin mahmud D.M. says:

    Love from Bangladesh ❤️❤️❤️😃.

  95. Ciara Vizzard says:

    I totally got lost in the logic around 12min12sec mark. Is there another video I can watch to further understand what you were explaining?

  96. Ben Smeets says:

    Steve, this is really great to learn the basics. and provides meaning to an almost mechanical playing of chords. Thanks for putting all effort and time to share your knowledge with us.

  97. Adrian Russell says:

    Big penny dropped today cheers bro

  98. anthony baltusis says:

    So I been using only few of these lesson. You have an amazing teaching method. Thank you for a common sense approach to learning theory.

  99. magrathean0 says:

    You got me over the hump with this one video. Thank you

  100. q1k9i3l0ä5å says:

    What's the name of the first video in this series?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *